Privacy, Surveillance, Data

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Privacy, Surveillance, Data

What does the right to privacy mean in the digital age? The digital age challenges traditional notions of privacy. Digital technologies enhance the capacity of States, companies and individuals to conduct surveillance, interception and data collection. What is the human rights framework applicable to the development, use, and sale of surveillance technologies? What are the human rights standards that should regulate data collection, storage and use? And what are the human rights safeguards that need to be put in place?

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Privacy, Data, and Surveillance; Security - Counter-Terrorism;
Business - Private Sector

Working Group

Military and security products and services in cyberspace and their human rights impacts

Report of the Working group on the human rights impacts of mercenaries, mercenary-related actors and private military and security companies engaging in cyberactivities

2021

Privacy, Data, and Surveillance; Artificial Intelligence; Discrimination and equality;
Business - Private Sector

Special Rapporteurs

Report on the Freedom of Thought

Report of the Special Rapporteur on the freedom of religion or belief, Ahmed Shaheed

2021

Privacy, surveillance, data

Special Rapporteurs

Elements that are needed to set a rights-based global agenda

Report presented to the 44th session of the Human Rights Council on the elements that are needed to set a rights-based global agenda for advancing the right to mental health, discussing digital surveillance

2020

Privacy, Data, and Surveillance

Special Rapporteurs

Privacy and COVID19

Report by the Special Rapporteur on the right to privacy, Joseph A. Cannataci, on the impact of measures to combat COVID-19 on data protection, technology and surveillance

2021

Privacy, surveillance, data

Special Rapporteurs

Protecting against gender-based privacy infringements

Report presented to the 43rd session of the Human Rights Council on protecting against gender-based privacy infringements, noting that privacy infringements happen in multiple, interrelated and recurring forms facilitated by digital technologies, in both private and public settings across physical and national boundaries. Online privacy infringements, reflect and extend offline privacy infringements. Digital technologies amplify their scope and intensify their impact

2020

Privacy, Data, and Surveillance

Special Rapporteurs

Situation of human rights defenders online

Report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders, Mary Lawlor, on priorities and working methods

2020

Artificial Intelligence; Privacy, Data, and Surveillance; Discrimination and Equality

Human Rights Council

Use of artificial intelligence (AI) on the enjoyment of the right to privacy and associated rights

Report the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights presented to the 48th session of the Human Rights Council

2021

Privacy, Data, and Surveillance;
Business - Private Sector

Working Group

Border security technologies and monitoring services, including the use of biometric data

Impact of the use of private military and security services in immigration and border management on the protection of
the rights of all migrants: Report of the Working Group on the use of mercenaries as a means of violating human rights and impeding the exercise of the right of peoples to self-determination

2020

Privacy, surveillance, data

Special Rapporteurs

Persisting impunity for human rights violations

Report presented to the 74th session of the UNGA on the persisting impunity for human rights violations committed against human rights defenders and the challenges that exist in combating it, noting that digital attacks require complex investigations and most States have the resources to acquire technology and powerful software that can be used in digital attacks on human rights defenders and that the existence of legislation restricting access to public information and the lack of independent accountability mechanisms makes it impossible to determine how the acquired technology is being used, let alone establishing responsibility, and recommending that States should establish independent to monitor and investigate the use of digital technologies for surveillance, to ensure that any such use is consistent with the principles of legality, necessity and legitimacy of objectives and that companies that sell surveillance technology should refrain from doing so if there are indications that it is being used in ways that violate human rights

2019